KEYNOTE SPEAKERS & INVITED SYMPOSIA

Confirmed Keynote Speakers and Invited Symposia Coordinators

One of the main goals of the EUSARF 2018 Porto Conference is to encourage participation and debate. Therefore, the plenary sessions will be organised with two Keynote Speakers addressing the main topics of the conference and stimulating two-folded debating. Furthermore, some researchers in the field of child welfare and protection were invited to organize symposia.

 

The Keynote Speakers who have already been confirmed are the following:

 

 

Bo Vinnerljung

University of Stockholm, Sweden

Bo Vinnerljung is an Emeritus Professor in social work at the University of Stockholm and a senior researcher at Karolinska Institutet. He has done research on children with adverse childhood backgrounds for 25 years, especially on their long-term development. Usually he works in interdisciplinary research teams, using Swedish national population data in longitudinal designs.

Bo Vinnerljung

Hans Grietens

University of Groningen, NL

Hans Grietens obtained a Master’s degree in Clinical Child and Developmental Psychology at the University of Leuven (Belgium) and a PhD in Social Sciences at the University of Groningen (the Netherlands). Since 2010, he has been a Full Professor at the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences of the University of Groningen.
He is conducting research on child welfare issues, with foster care and child maltreatment being his core subjects. He is studying decision-making processes in the foster care system, especially in matching and reunification, experiences and needs of foster children, interventions for foster families, and short- and long-term outcomes of foster placement. In his research on child maltreatment he is focusing on policies towards abuse and neglect, participation of children in child protection studies, parenting foster children with complex trauma and historical abuse of children in the foster care system. He has a particular interest in studying voices of vulnerable children and in qualitative research methods.
He is president of the European Scientific Association on Residential and Family Care for Children and Adolescents and a member of the International Association for Outcome-Based Evaluation and Research on Families’ and Children’s Services, the Foster Care Research Network and the International Network on Studies of Inquiries into Child Abuse, Politics of Apology and Historical Representations of Children in Out-of-home Care.
Between 2007 and 2016, he was visiting professor at the University of Trondheim, Norway, and the University of Paris X Nanterre, France.

Hans Grietens

Janet Boddy

University of Sussex, UK

Janet Boddy is a Professor of Child, Youth and Family Studies, and directs the Centre for Innovation and Research in Childhood and Youth (CIRCY) at the University of Sussex (www.sussex.ac.uk/esw/circy). 
Her research is concerned with child and family lives and with services to support children and families, in the UK and internationally. Her recent work includes a study of policy and practice approaches to work with families of children in care in four European countries (funded by the UK Nuffield Foundation), a study of everyday lives over time for young people in care in England and France (EU MSCF funded, with Hélène Join-Lambert at Paris Nanterre University), and research with care-experienced young adults in Norway, Denmark and England (funded by the Research Council of Norway and led by Elisabeth Backe-Hansen at NOVA). Janet Boddy has a long-standing interest in research ethics and in cross-national and qualitative methodology.
She led a study for the UK Economic and Social Research Council National Centre for Research Methods, devising innovative methods to study environment in the lives of children and families in India and the UK (the book of the project was published by Policy Press in 2017), and she has advised on research ethics for organisations including ESRC and the European Research Council. 

Janet Boddy

Jill Duerr Berrick

U.C. Berkeley, USA

Jill Duerr Berrick serves as the Zellerbach Family Foundation Professor in the School of Social Welfare at U.C. Berkeley.  Berrick’s research focuses on the relationship of the state to vulnerable families, particularly those touched by the child welfare system.  She has written or co-written 11 books on topics relating to family poverty, child maltreatment, and child welfare services and has written extensively for academic journals. Berrick’s research approach typically relies upon the voices of service system consumers to identify the impacts of social problems and social service solutions in family life.  Her newest book, The Impossible Imperative: Navigating the Competing Principles of Child Protection examines child welfare professionals and the morally contentious and intellectually demanding choices they regularly face in their work with children and families. 

Jill Duerr Berrick

Kalwant Bhopal

University of Birmingham, UK

Kalwant Bhopal is a Professor of Education and Social Justice, Professorial Research Fellow and Deputy Director of the Centre for Research in Race and Education in the School of Education, University of Birmingham. Kalwant’ s research focuses on the achievements and experiences of minority ethnic groups in education. She has conducted research on exploring discourses of identity and intersectionality examining the lives of Black minority ethnic groups as well as examining the marginal position of Gypsies and Travellers. Her research specifically explores how processes of racism, exclusion and marginalisation operate in predominantly White spaces with a focus on social justice and inclusion. She is Visiting Professor at Harvard University in the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Visiting Professor at Kings College London (Department of Education and Professional Studies).

Kalwant Bhopal

Katrin Križ

Emmanuel College, USA

Katrin Križ is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Emmanuel College in Boston, USA. Her research interests lie in the areas of child welfare and poverty alleviation. Much of her research is comparative/international. She has always been intrigued by the question how states interact with disadvantaged populations in law, public policy and welfare practice. She has published on child welfare systems and immigrant families in the OECD, the impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on the lives of low-income families in the United States, and education for the children of immigrant migrant farmworkers in the United States. She is currently working on a research project comparing child protection workers’ views on and practices of children’s participation in Norway and the United States. She is also participating in a large-scale, comparative research project on professional discretion in decision-making in child protection in several countries in Europe. 

Katrin Križ

Maria Barbosa-Ducharne

University of Porto, Portugal

Maria Barbosa-Ducharne is a Professor at the Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto (FPCEUP), Portugal. Her main research interests are human development after early adversity, child protection, foster care, residential care and adoption. Since 2007 she has been responsible for the fields of Adoption and Out-of-home Child and Youth Care, at the FPCEUP. As from 2011, she is the main researcher of the Group for Research and Intervention on Out-of-home Care and Adoption. Recent research projects under her direction are: (1) IPPA – Intergenerational Research on Adoption: Grandparents, parents and children – 2008/2012; (2) Adoptive family dynamics and adoptees’ development – 2011/2018; (3) Residential care quality assessment in Portugal: a nationwide study – 2012/2019.  She has directed several Master and Phd students on Adoption and Residential Care. She has published widely in the fields of Adoption and Child and Youth Residential Care.

Maria Barbosa-Ducharne

Marit Skivenes

University of Bergen, Norway

Marit Skivenes is a professor in Political Science at the Department of Administration and Organization Theory at the University of Bergen, Norway, and the Director of the Centre for Research on Discretion and Paternalism.
Skivenes has written numerous articles on topics about the role of welfare policies and practices to understand the legitimacy problems modern states face. Specifically, her research studies the discretionary decision making in welfare states services; child protection systems; children’s rights and their welfare; legitimacy of state intervention and justifications of states restricting individuals’ freedom. Skivenes has led a range of international research projects, and been awarded several prestigious research grants, including an European Research Council Consolidator Grant in 2016. More information about Marit Skivenes can be found here: http://www.discretion.uib.no/people/principal-investigator/

Marit Skivenes

Mildred Mushunje

SRHR Africa Trust, Zimbabwe

Mildred Mushunje is a passionate and self- driven advocate for gender and social justice. She has a keen interest in women and children’s rights. She works on issues of social protection and gender with a particular interest in women’s empowerment as a pathway to gender equality. She has participated in various national and regional policy debates on social protection, child rights, women’s rights and livelihoods. She has several publications on social protection, gender and child rights. She holds a Bachelors Degree in Social Work (Zimbabwe), Masters Degree in Gender and Development studies (University of Manchester) and a Doctoral Degree in Social Work from University of KwaZulu Natal (S.A). She has several post-graduate Diplomas including Women’s Human Rights (Lund University, Sweden), Community Management of HIV (Galilee College, Israel), Micro-Finance (University of Zimbabwe).
Mildred Mushunje  has worked with the Government of Zimbabwe as a probation officer, is a former lecturer with the University of Zimbabwe and Women’s University in Africa. She has also served with the United Nations and civil society. She is a founding member of the Justice for Children East and Southern Africa, an organization that addresses the human rights of children. She also serves on the boards of civil society organisations that are mandated with child protection. She is also an Advisory Council member for the Southern Africa Social Protection Experts Network.

Mildred Mushunje

Robbie Gilligan

Trinity College, Ireland

Robbie Gilligan is a Professor of Social Work and Social Policy at Trinity College Dublin. Much of his teaching and research focuses on children and young people in state care, and young adults who have grown up in state care. He also has interests in the experiences of migrant children and young people, and children and young people living with disability. Earlier in his career, Robbie was a youth worker, social worker and foster carer. His current research work includes serving as co-principal investigator on the Care to Work Pathways Study – a five country study on the experiences of young adults who have grown up in care and made a successful transition to the world of work.  He is a member of the Board of the European Scientific Association for Residential and Foster Care, and of INTRAC - The International Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood from Care. He is also a member of the Editorial Board of the journals, Child Abuse and Neglect, Children and Society, Child Indicators Research and the European Journal of Social Work, and of the Advisory Board of the journal Adoption and Fostering.

Robbie Gilligan

Shalhevet Attar-Schwartz

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Shalhevet Attar-Schwartz is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Work and Social Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. 
Her research focuses on child well-being and child welfare. She is especially interested in children and youth in public care. She has published extensively on children's safety, quality of life, social support, and psychosocial and educational adjustment in residential care.  Her research on children's outcomes in care is guided by an ecological perspective, taking into account, not only risk and protective factors in the child level and his/her family, but also the child's experiences while in care, as well as organizational factors. In order to examine such ecological models, she mainly utilizes multilevel analysis statistical models.
She is also interested in issues of social support of children in residential care by their nuclear and extended family, by their peers and by the residential care staff as correlates of emotional, behavioral, educational, and health outcomes. 
Her research interests include also intergenerational relationships and their contribution to child well-being. She has conducted such an examination in the Israeli local context among Arab and Jewish adolescents and in the international level with researchers from the UK. She has examined the issue of intergenerational relationships among young people in residential care and she is currently conducting a research on child well-being in kinship foster care, mostly provided by grandparents, compared with non-kinship care. 
She is a member of several governmental and non-governmental committees aiming to promote the well-being of children in care in Israel.
 

Shalhevet Attar-Schwartz

The Invited Symposia Coordinators who have already been confirmed are the following:

 

 

Ann Phoenix

University of London, UK

Ann Phoenix is a Professor of Psychosocial Studies at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, Department of Social Sciences, UCL Institute of Education, University of London and a Fellow of the British Academy. From 2016 she has been the Erkko Professor at the Helsinki University Collegium for Advanced Studies. Her research is mainly about social identities and the ways in which psychological experiences and social processes are linked. It includes work on racialized and gendered identities and experiences; mixed-parentage, masculinities, consumption, young people and their parents, the transition to motherhood, families, migration and transnational families.  Much of her research draws on mixed methods and includes narrative approaches. She is currently conducting a study of Masculinities and Ethnicities in New Times with 11-14-year-old boys and some girls living in Helsinki.

Ann Phoenix

Daniela Reimer

University of Siegen, Germany

Daniela Reimer obtained her PhD at the University of Siegen, Germany. Together with Klaus Wolf, University of Siegen, Germany, she founded the Siegen Foster Care Research Group as well as the International Foster Care Research Network ( www.foster-care-research.org ). During the last 12 years she has conducted extensive research on biographies of young people from foster care at the University of Siegen. As from September 2018 she will hold the position of a senior researcher and lecturer at the ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland.
Daniela Reimer‘s research focus is particularly on the biographical experiences of young people. Her research is qualitative with a strong interest in social pedagogy perspectives and the narrative. She has done extensive research on the transition into foster care from the children’s point of view, on (foster) family cultures, on the interplay of normality and identity in young people from foster care, on break down in foster care and she is carrying out a qualitative longitudinal study (up to now two waves, third wave in planning) with young adults from foster care. Recently she has done some research on foster care and migration. At the same time, Daniela Reimer is working on the transfer of research into practice, developping new ways of advanced vocational training opportunities for social workers and educators.

Daniela Reimer

Elizabeth Fernandez

The University of New South Wales, Australia

Elizabeth Fernandez (PhD), Professor of Social Work, School of Social Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia teaches courses in Life Span Development, Child and Family Welfare Practice and Professional Supervision. Her research focuses on child and family poverty, pathways and outcomes for children in care, child abuse prevention, early intervention and family support, reunification of separated children and outcomes of care leavers. She has led several Australian Research Council funded research studies focusing on these themes, and most recently served as the Principal Researcher on a national study of the long-term outcomes of adult care leavers. She has been a research advisor to major research projects in child welfare and undertaken consultative roles to the Government and Non-Government Sector and the Judiciary. Her recent books include Theoretical and Empirical Insights into Child and Family Poverty (Fernandez et al, 2015); Accomplishing Permanency: Reunification Pathways and Outcomes for Foster Children (Fernandez 2012); How Does Foster Care Work? International Evidence on Outcomes (Fernandez and Barth 2010). She is Associate Editor for Children and Youth Services Review and Journal of Child and Family Studies, and serves on the Editorial Boards of Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, and Children Australia. She is a Board Member of the International Society for Child Indicators (ISCI), Executive Board Member of the International Association for Outcome Based Evaluation and Research on Family and Children’s Services (IAOBERfcs), and Chairs the Scientific Committee of the Association of Children’s Welfare Agencies (ACWA) Biennial National Conferences.

https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/professor-elizabeth-aureen-fernandez

Elizabeth Fernandez

Emmanuel Grupper

Ono Academic College, Israel

Emmanuel Grupper is an Associate Professor at the Ono Academic College in Israel where he serves as deputy dean of the Faculty for Humanities. He is also Vice President of the International Federation of Educative Communities (FICE), and a Board member of the International Association of Social Education (AIEJI). Until 2012, he served as Director of the Residential Education and Care Department in the Israeli Ministry of Education.
Emmanuel Grupper’s academic work encompasses several fields where he combines his expertise and leadership position in child and youth care work, both nationally and internationally, with special focus on extra-familial education & care for children and adolescents at risk situations and the professionalization process of child and youth care workers.

Emmanuel Grupper

Fred Wulczyn

University of Chicago, USA

Fred Wulczyn is a Senior Research Fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago and the Director of the Center for State Child Welfare Data. The work of the Data Center is organized around the use of research evidence in public and private child welfare agencies. A core asset of the Data Center is the Multistate Foster Care Data Archive, which for more than 25 years has been an important source of research evidence used by public and private child welfare agencies to manage their programs. The Data Center provides support to more than 20 states across the US and touches broadly on the problem of increasing research evidence use: building opportunity, creating capacity, and increasing motivation. Fred Wulczyn’s work has focused on how states respond to children who are unable to live at home. He brings a multidisciplinary perspective to this work, drawing inspiration from disciplines such as mathematics, population biology, human development, sociology, system dynamics, and social work. His contributions to research evidence use focuses on the evidence needed to operate complex systems. In addition, his current work on human capital formation in New York City addresses the way policymakers think about child well-being and public investment in children.
Fred Wulczyn received a PhD from the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, a Master of Social Work from Marywood University, and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Sociology from Juniata College.

Fred Wulczyn

Gerald P. Mallon

Hunter College in New York City, USA

Gerald P. Mallon, DSW, is the Julia Lathrop Professor of Child Welfare and the Associate Dean of Scholarship and Research at the Silberman School of Social Work at.
For more than 43 years, Mallon has been a child welfare practitioner, advocate, educator, and researcher. He was the first child welfare professional in the U.S. to research, write about, and develop programs for LGBTQ youth in child welfare settings.  He has also written extensively about LGBT foster and adoptive parenting.
He serves on numerous editorial boards and is the Senior Editor of the professional journal, Child Welfare and the author or editor of more than twenty-three books. His most recent publications are: Social work practice with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, (3rd edition) published by Routledge Press and Child welfare for the twenty-first century: A Handbook of practices, policies, and programs (2nd edition), Co-Edited with Peg Hess, published by Columbia University Press.
In his role as the Executive Director of the NCCWE, Gerald Mallon has traveled to all 50 states, many territories and numerous tribes to deliver technical assistance and training on a range of child welfare related issues, particularly as they relate to youth and to foster care.  He has lectured and worked extensively throughout the United States, and internationally in Argentina, Australia, Canada, Cuba, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, and the United Kingdom.
Gerald Mallon also lives the talk he talks, in addition to being a child welfare professional for his entire career, he has been a foster parent and is the adoptive parent of now grown children.

 

Gerald P. Mallon

Harriet Ward

Loughborough University, UK

Harriet Ward is a Professor of Child and Family Research at Loughborough University, UK. She founded Loughborough’s Centre for Child and Family Research (CCFR) in 2002 and directed it until she stepped down in April 2014. She has over 30 years of experience both as a research director and field researcher, as an adviser to policymakers and service providers, and as a social work practitioner. She was awarded a CBE for services to children and families in June 2012.
Harriet Ward’s research focusses on the relationship between the state and the family both now and in the past. Previous studies include the development and piloting of a methodology for assessing the outcomes of local authority care (the Looking After Children Project); studies of the relationship between costs and  outcomes in children’s services; an empirical study of the experiences of children who entered the Waifs and Strays Society (Children’s Society) in the nineteenth century; an eight year prospective longitudinal study of children identified in infancy as likely to suffer significant harm; and a scoping study for the development of a family justice observatory aimed at enhancing the use of robust empirical research and administrative data in the English family justice system. She is currently working on a major study (with Barnardo’s Australia) of the outcomes of open adoption in New South Wales.
Harriet Ward is also a founder member of the international network of research on transitions to adulthood from care (INTRAC) and the English representative on the Board of EUSARF (European Scientific Association on Residential and Family Care for Children and Adolescents). Findings from her research programme have underpinned developments in policy and practice concerning child protection, looked after children and adoption in the UK, the USA, Australia and parts of Europe.

 

Harriet Ward

Hilda Paredes Dávila

National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico

Hilda Paredes Dávila completed her Graduate and Master's degree at the Faculty of Psychology of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, where, currently, she is a candidate for a PhD in Psychology in the field of Educational and Developmental Psychology.
Since 1994 she has been professor of Postgraduate and Bachelor degrees at the Faculty of Psychology of the National Autonomous University of México. She is a postgraduate tutor and responsible for the project “Learning Communities”, part of the Residence Programme in Scholar Psychology of the Master’s degree in Psychology. Currently, she is responsible for teaching and representing the director of the Faculty of Psychology in the Masters on Teaching in High School Education. Her research goes from processes of reading comprehension to training of students in professional environments. She is a founder of a “reading room” in the Dr. Julián McGregor y Sánchez Navarro Community Centre and responsible for the project “Formation of scholar psychologists in the promotion of reading and writing in community contexts”.

Hilda Paredes Dávila

Isabel Soares

University of Minho, Portugal

Isabel Soares is a Professor of Psychology at the School of Psychology, University of Minho, Portugal. Her teaching activities include Developmental Psychopathology and Clinical Psychology. She is the coordinator of the Portuguese Attachment Research Group and PI of several funded projects in the field. Her current research is focused on attachment disordered behaviours and other psychopathological conditions in children living in residential care and in high-risk families, by using a multilevel approach and considering GXE interaction and the role of neural activity. Additionally, she is particularly interested in attachment based interventions to  
promote sensitive parenting and child attachment security. 

Isabel Soares

Jesús Palacios

University of Seville, Spain

Jesús Palacios, PhD, is a Professor of Developmental Psychology at the University of Seville, Spain. He has conducted research on both domestic and international adoptions in Spain, especially focusing on issues of recovery after early adversity and parent-child relationships. He has published numerous books and articles on foster care and adoption, including Psychological Issues in Adoption: Research and Practice, coedited with David Brodzinsky (Praeger, 2005). He has developed protocols for the assessment of adoption suitability and has co-authored a preadoption training programme for prospective adopters, as well as books for both prospective and adoptive parents. In Spain and other countries, he consults regularly with governmental agencies about how to improve systems of foster care and adoption on behalf of children, and he has played a leadership role in connecting adoption researchers around the world. He hosted the Fourth International Conference on Adoption Research in Bilbao, Spain, in 2013.

Jesús Palacios

Jorge F. del Valle

University of Oviedo, Spain

Jorge Fernández del Valle is a Professor at the University of Oviedo, Faculty of Psychology, in Spain, where he has taught subjects related to psychosocial intervention, child care and programme evaluation since 1989. Previously, he worked as a social educator and psychologist in children’s homes. He was also the coordinator of family intervention programmes at the Department of Social Services of the city of Oviedo. Del Valle is the director of the Child and Family Research Group (GIFI) at the University of Oviedo. His research focuses on programme evaluation in residential and foster care and needs’ assessments of particular groups, such as young asylum seekers or children in residential care suffering from mental health problems. As a result of this research activity, he has developed a Recording and Assessment System for Residential Child Care (SERAR) that has been implemented in nine Autonomous Communities in Spain. Furthermore, he has developed a system to evaluate the quality of child residential care facilities, carrying out external evaluations in Spain and Portugal since 1994. In 2013 he published the National Standards of Quality for Child Residential Care, requested by the Spanish Ministry of Health and Social Services. Del Valle is author/co-author/editor of 15 books and nearly 100 peer review papers and book chapters.

Jorge F. del Valle

Lisa Holmes

University of Oxford, UK

Lisa Holmes is the Director of the Rees Center at the. She has an international reputation for her research on child welfare and was until recently the Director of the Centre for Child and Family Research at the University of Loughborough. 
Over the past seventeen years, Lisa Holmes has undertaken a range of research and evaluations to inform child welfare policy and practice. She has been leading work nationally and internationally on the cost calculator for assessing costs of children’s social care services and relating these to needs and outcomes. She is also co-chair of the International Work Group for Therapeutic Residential Care. 
Lisa Holmes has presented papers at numerous national and international conferences and has published a range of books, articles and reports. She first started her career in child welfare as an outreach worker in the early 1990s, followed by two years working as a residential social worker in a local authority children’s home.

 

Lisa Holmes

Maria Filomena Gaspar

University of Coimbra, Portugal

Maria Filomena Gaspar is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences at the University of Coimbra, Portugal (FPCEUC). Her research interests and scientific activity is focused on educational psychology and family and parenting education. She has been involved in projects on child development and education, family/parenting education and intervention, divorce education, parental participation in the education of preschool age children, and early education as a way of promotion and prevention. At an international level, she has developed research with the university of Oxford and Louvain (Catholic) and is a member of the European Incredible Years® Forum where all European partners conducting research with the Incredible Years Program meet and discuss present and future research and initiatives. She has participated in a broad range of national and international collaborations. Apart from her academic activities, she is a scientific advisor of research and intervention projects at national and international levels (e.g. EPIC), and provides training, runs and supervises parenting education groups in community and clinical settings using evidence based programmes.

Maria Filomena Gaspar

Mariana Incarnato

Association for the Rights of Children and Adolescents DONCEL, Argentina

Mariana Incarnato is MA in Design and Management of Social Policies and Programs  at the Latin-American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO-Argentina) and BA in Psychology (University of Buenos Aires). Founder and Executive Director  of the Civil Association for the Rights of Children and Adolescents DONCEL for the last 12 years and co-founder of the Latin American Network of care leavers, Incarnato was a key player and actively advocated  for the approval of the national law 27.364 of care leavers in Argentina in 2017. She is a former member of the Adoption Team at the Carolina Tobar Garcia Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Young People of Buenos Aires. In 2012, Incarnato was selected as a social entrepreneur from the Global organization Ashoka. Author of several articles on the subject of adolescents and young people, her organization has worked with more than 2000 young persons, professionals and staff involved in providing care, and leaving care services.

Mariana Incarnato

Mike Stein

University of York, UK


Mike Stein is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York.  He is a qualified social worker and has worked as a probation officer, a senior child care officer and a manager of social work services. From 1975 at Leeds University and from 1995 at York University he has been researching the problems faced by vulnerable young people, including care leavers, young people missing from home and care, and neglected and maltreated adolescents.  

His recent research and publications include: young people's transitions from care to adulthood in European and Post-communist Eastern European and Central Asian societies; international leaving care practice; theorising transitions from care; maltreated and neglected adolescents, and the history of the rights movement of young people in care.

He has been involved in the preparation of Guidance for Leaving Care legislation in the UK and consulted internationally on leaving care services; been an adviser to the development of the rights movement for young people in care in England, and been a member of the Laming Review, Keeping Children in Care Out of Trouble. He was a founder member and joint co-ordinator of the International Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood from Care (INTRAC).

Mike Stein

Mónica López López

University of Groningen, NL

Mónica López López obtained her PhD in Psychology at the University of Oviedo, Spain. She is an Associate Professor and Rosalind Franklin Fellow at the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences of the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
For the last 12 years, López has been actively seeking a way of improving child protection systems through research on decision-making, with a special interest in a) assessments and decisions of out-of-home placement and reunification, b) decisions of matching children with foster families, and c) participation of children and families in decision-making. 
In her research, López focuses on the voice of the service users, children and families, as a powerful instrument to improve welfare services. She is currently working on the project Audre on the experiences of LGBTQIA+ young people in out-of-home care, and project Hebe on the experiences of children who have been involved in child protection investigations. Since 2015, she has worked on Hestia, a European funded project comparing policies and practices of child protection in England, Germany and the Netherlands.
López has been involved in transferring scientific knowledge, teaching at the international master Youth Society and Policy, training professionals, and working in international research networks. She is a board member of EUSARF and she was the founder of the EUSARF Academy, a network for PhD students and early careers. She is the Coordinator of Internationalization for the Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at the University of Groningen, and the Chair of the Summer Schools Programme of the University of Groningen.

Mónica López López

Orlanda Cruz

University of Porto, Portugal

Orlanda Cruz is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences of the University of Porto and co-director of the Doctoral Programme in Psychology. She is also a researcher at the Centre for Psychology at the University of Porto, where she coordinates the research group in Development and Education. She conducts research in the domains of Developmental Psychology, Parenting and Parenting Interventions. She has published several papers and book chapters, as well as a book on Parenting (“Parentalidade”). From 2006 to 2010 she integrated a national work force responsible for a nation-wide study on the evaluation of parenting interventions and for consulting on parenting interventions with at-risk families for the National Commission for At-risk Child and Youth Protection and the Social Welfare Office. She is a certified provider in the Triple P Positive Parenting programme, namely Triple P - Seminars (level 2), Triple P –  Discussion Groups (level 3), and Group Triple P (level 4). She also received training in the Pathways Triple P (level 5). She is currently involved in the study of the effectiveness of Group Triple P with low-income mothers, using an RCT research design.

Orlanda Cruz

Shlomo Romi

Bar Ilan University Israel

Shlomo Romi is a full professor at the School of Education at Bar Ilan University, Israel. He was the Head of the School of Education and now is the Director of the Institute for Education and Community Research and the Head of the International office for Academic Affairs, office of the Vice-President at Bar Ilan University Israel. He obtained his BA and MA from Bar-Ilan's Department of Psychology and his Ph.D. in School Psychology from O.I.S.E, the University of Toronto, Canada. Shlomo Romi's fields of research include nonformal education and parent-school relationships. He also studies the characteristics of at risk adolescents, as well as topics in educational psychology, such as classroom management and the integration of children and adolescents with special needs into normative educational frameworks.

Shlomo Romi

Tarja Pösö

University of Tampere, Finland

Tarja Pösö works as a Professor in Social Work at the University of Tampere, Finland.  She has studied child protection for more than 20 years, and has published her work in Finnish and English. She is currently working with the notions of ‘consent’ and ‘objection’ in child protection decision-making. The dilemma inspiring this Finnish study is that as some child protection removal decisions include restrictions of some fundamental and human rights, one should ask on what terms, if any, it is legitimate to request consent from children and parents. She also works as a part-time Professor at the University of Bergen, Norway, contributing to comparative research projects on child protection carried out by Marit Skivenes. More about her work can be found on the website: http://www.uta.fi/yky/sty/yhteystiedot/poso.html

Tarja Pösö

Virginia C. Strand

Fordham University , USA

Virginia C. Strand is a Professor at the Graduate School of Social Service, Fordham University, and formerly Co-Director of the National Center for Social Work Trauma Education and Workforce Development.  She has over 35 years of experience in social work practice, research, education and training focused on preparing practitioners for trauma practice.  She has wide experience conducting research in children’s mental health and child welfare.  Virginia Strand has authored over 30 journal articles and is co-editor of a recently published book on Trauma Responsive Child Welfare Systems.

Virginia C. Strand

 

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